In which I admit it . I mostly hate new things

Another day in which I wear so many different hats that I need more than one head.

A morning of intensive day-job work; then Very Quickly painting the kitchen wall because Trevor’s Monster Fridge is arriving earlier than expected. Congratulations to the boys from BUT for getting this down the street and up our narrow twisty stairs without damage and in ten minutes flat.

It is A++, economical, capacious and necssary. And I hate it. I will hate it till Trevor boxes it in with off-white painted panelling.

Then I scoured the old sink for what seems like the zillionth time because it is Work Sink and we cannot put in the new one until we have done all the messy, staining stuff. Then I dragged these heavy terracotta pipes upstairs to make wine storage in the unused fireplace (we have two in the salon) I do like those. But I am going crazy over all this wiring we have acquired that needs to be concealed somehow.

Trev also knocked off the horrible, old  dirty orangey yellowish  brown kitchen wall  tiles that seem ubiquitous to old French houses. I have even seen sinks in this colour. Why?!

If anyone wants to recycle these, come and get them. OK, OK, so I don’t love EVERYTHING old…..

 

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About coteetcampagne

Artist, period home maker, renovator, restorer, francophile. My mission is to save the old stuff, one beautiful piece at a time
This entry was posted in Renovation and restoration diary- France and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to In which I admit it . I mostly hate new things

  1. Oh, 70’s colors. My mom said that her first apartment had harvest gold appliances and she was grateful for that because half the units in the building had avocado.

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  2. Osyth says:

    You do make me smile! Wires are my nemesis. Truly. And diaorea coloured anything including tiles 😁

    Liked by 1 person

  3. francetaste says:

    Make sure your fridge still has plenty of ventilation!
    Check out this article about Einstein’s contribution to refrigerators: https://www.wired.com/story/einsteins-little-known-passion-project-a-refrigerator/
    Who knew?!?!
    As for old/new, there’s a period of old that’s just icky. But if something is REALLY old, the ick factor magically turns into patina. Though I doubt that even in a distant future those tiles will ever be considered to have patina.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. poshbirdy says:

    Hahaha! Those tiles are awful. Good riddance to them. They’re the one horror that I don’t have x

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Noel G says:

    I do enjoy dipping into your blog, and hearing the news. I must admit it. I mostly hate old things, though. Lovely to look at on a visit, I am a National trust addict. But I love coming home my 1990’s house. With its straight edges, and square (okay square-ish!) corners.

    On the other hand… I am beginning to see the attraction. Your house looks and sounds fabulous 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Bizzy says:

    No, not the orange tiles! Kill them now! Crush them and use them to improve the drainage of potted plants. Crush them, I say. There are so many equisitely gorgeous things in France. Then there are the orange tiles. Go figure.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Ellen A. says:

    Um, yeh, you can keep the kitchen wall tiles. What I think is extremely hideous are the French floor tiles in orange/yellow to brown orange like a flame. Have you seen those? Dreadful. They smack of the 1970s. I’m not fond of the tiny square industrial tiles either. Love the tomettes and the more decorative large square tiles though. A matter of taste and era, I suppose.

    Liked by 1 person

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