Mixing materials

I am fascinated by the gorgeous mix of materials and colours in this one French house found on http://www.cotemaison.fr

I like the change in colour on the stair risers at the door way. And the raw wood panelling on the stairs playing with the neatly painted ceiling. And the mix of old tiles on the floor.

Spots and a chandelier? Lovely! And why can’t I find a clock like that on my next brocante run?

 

Advertisements

About coteetcampagne

Artist, period home maker, renovator, restorer, francophile. My mission is to save the old stuff, one beautiful piece at a time
This entry was posted in Art, design and inspiration blog and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to Mixing materials

  1. Janette says:

    Yes I totally agree with you that the mix of colours and materials are really well done and like you say that clock is fabulous!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. poshbirdy says:

    Some lovely touches here. Personally I think maybe the door works here, but it’s a case by case thing (and anything would look good with that gorgeous clock!)

    Liked by 1 person

    • I would love that clock, and the door might work there .In our case the door at the bottom of stairs in the salon swung open and blocked the way to the kitchen and drove me mad. Also, we want the heat from the log burner to drift up the stairs!

      Like

  3. Osyth says:

    This neatly parcels up the vision … now to try and execute on it! The palette is delicious and the lack of rigid conformity enhances it greatly. I’ll fight you for the clock

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, I think we may be evenly matched. This photo has stirred up some extreme opinions, interesting. I think it references 18thc palette and style updated and even has a soupçon of Spitalfields silk weaver

      Liked by 1 person

      • Osyth says:

        I see so many things that would work in my humble little house. For example our upstairs walls are literally made of planks — they are not polished and refined but rough and unevenly cut. But we want to keep them exposed (not hessianed and wallpapered as they were from possibly late 19th C possibly even a little later than that – 1920s ish (I am going to get the papers dated for more accuracy if I can) and certainly not covered with sol stratifier as our predecessor did. We have a difficult staircase (I will feature it at some point and you will squeal ESCHER, I promise) and I actually like the idea of painting the uprisers and distressing them. Not all houses are proportionally simple, not all interiors boast many places to place an article and I love this (yes, yes, yes certainly 18thC) palette. Spitalfields silk weaver … interesting notion. By the way have you ever come across the Norwich Weavers … interesting influences. There is a textiles museum I think. I ramble. More coffee required 😂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes and yes. And thanks for getting it.
        Maybe us humble hovellers should start that club?
        We have rough boarding in one bedroom and to be frank I was going to just clean it and rake the dangerous splinters off and leave it .
        That will almost certainly be our stair front treatment too.
        Well, we can’t all agree, I’m not going to be deflected by doubters anymore

        Liked by 1 person

      • Osyth says:

        That’s just it … we ARE in a different club. I wrote yesterday, as you know, of the palatial belle-epoque appartement we are dwelling in for a short time. The celing heights, the plasterwork, the columns, the panelling, the floors have nothing whatsoever in common with our house in Marcolès … what will work there is the polar opposite to what works here. Maybe it is only when you have met and fallen in love with a humble hovel that you can understand. What shall we call the club? Because I really like the idea. And so will our houses 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thought about it for a while. It was obvious from the start of our journey that we are in a totally different budget, leagues and position on our project

        Liked by 1 person

      • Osyth says:

        But you actually say that at the start of your blog …. that it is a certain madness unexplained that drives people like us. Like you we have dust and air to renovate on and are mostly doing it ourselves not because we wish to or we are afraid of French Artisans but because we have no budget for anything else. It will take years but we will love the result and it is actually no-one elses damned business what we love so long as we aren’t harming anyone. And I rather think that if one is picking a fight, they can get off my cloud!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I do say, but some folk only skim. Each to their own…and carry on coping creatively I say.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sorry, hit wrong button on moving train! Yes let’s do it, I’m a wee bit tired of being one-upped, no matter how kindly it is meant.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Osyth says:

        You are absolutely on. I’ll bet we will get a large number of people involved and it would be nice to share opinions with those that are on the same wave-length rather than feeling like Cinderella who has to be condescended to. Probably best I go and lie down now but honestly … .let’s put our minds to this idea. It has, as they say, legs sans doute

        Liked by 1 person

  4. francetaste says:

    I have seen comtoises like that at vide greniers, so you are sure to run into one eventually. You will have to paint it yourself; they are almost always very dark wood.
    I like wood paneling, but I think beadboard (like the ceiling) is better than the salvaged wood/pallet look, which is going to look ridiculous in a few years. It’s just too extreme, and too ubiquitous.
    The spots and chandelier are a good combo. If you need more light, you turn on the spots, but when they are off they don’t compete with the chandelier.

    Like

  5. bizzyella says:

    Really? You like this? You like a door on a staircase, with no landing? The unpainted wood paneling doesn’t look jarring against the otherwise soft painted finishes? Won’t that excellent clock warp or fade, stuck in a sunny breezeway like that? Plus it gets kind of lost in that spot. Painting risers a different color from the treads, nothing wrong with it but kind of ’70’s, don’t you think? Actually it’s all kind of ’70’s. Maybe that is turning into its own design era. I don’t know. Maybe I saw too much of this in California but, well, maybe that’s it. The woodbutcher/salvage yard/summer house thing, meh, been there done that. I do like the sculptural quality of the stairs. Nice bit of craftsmanship. Otherwise…. Reply welcome. I’d like to know what I’m missing.

    Like

    • I don’t like the door, I took mine off, but I like all the colours and the mix of materials and finishes. In a house of different eras that’s developed kind of organically as each generation adds layers, I think it makes sense.To me the colour palette is pure 18thc and so much more interesting in a disparate space. Not all houses are cohesive design wise, mine isn’t and this one will never be either

      Like

  6. Lynda says:

    Escher.

    Love it!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s