Episode 137 – Moody hues

Moody French walls- undercoatSo, Trev’s light finished floor , off white ceiling, and pale putty panelling have changed the way the light moves around this long room dramatically.

The kitchen cabinetry , corner cupboard, chairs and bench will all be enrobed in off white/pale putty too, and the old dining chairs re-upholstered in natural linen so-  I can put into practice my theory that  the two narrow end walls and a section of the side walls can be painted in a moody hue to balance this out and improve the visual impact of the odd elongated proportions in the kitchen/diner.

Above left- is the base coat of matte Gris Marmotte #3 emulsion. The long wall is the spine wall of the house, stone with layers of very old lime plaster (as is the window wall) and the remnants of wallpaper that just won’t budge- I think they are glued on by a secret super glue of some sort. This is a broken finish, so there is no need to get every scrap of old paper off; I am working with and celebrating the texture and character of these old walls

All the loose stuff is taken off and wall is wiped  clean (just damp cloth) before painting.

The second stage is -Right-Moody French walls second stage74238 to paint a liquid wall wax “cire” mix ( in this case dark blue with a teaspoon of leaf green per saucer) onto areas showing as darker bits using a loose circular movement, pressing in along the diagonal in both directions; with a chiselled bristle brush.

Finally, once almost dry, polish off with old cotton rags in a circular movement.- below

IMG_20160409_091759    Very French, very appropriate

wall French waxes

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About coteetcampagne

Artist, period home maker, renovator, restorer, francophile. My mission is to save the old stuff, one beautiful piece at a time
This entry was posted in Renovation and restoration diary- France, What we did, how we did it and what we used and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to Episode 137 – Moody hues

  1. Lynda says:

    Very beautiful! But, did I miss that part about what you did to seal the ceiling after the removal of all that ugly tile?

    Like

  2. Moody hues? I see what you did there. Very clever. The room looks good too.

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  3. poshbirdy says:

    Gorgeous colour. It’s going to look AMAZING

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Very nice. Talented chap that Trev…..

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  5. Osyth says:

    Stunning and certainly appropriate and effective 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Nadia says:

    Looks great. Sounds like a lot of effort but well worth it.

    Like

  7. gabriele says:

    You wrote, Very French, very appropriate. I say, also Very Effective!
    There is something very restful in the final result. It’s pleasing and comfortable and feels like it
    gives the wall more dimension. The actual surface may be pretty flat but what I see isn’t. And yes, the floor really does set it off.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. bizzyella says:

    Ooh, nice paint. Looks like it’s not a solid color, but some sort of special decorative finish. Is it?

    Liked by 1 person

  9. francetaste says:

    That is very beautiful. I love that last picture. I think my painter would kill me if I asked for it. He is still in the midst of putting enduit (what is that in English anyway?) on the walls, and I frankly love the look, but as we are not aiming for crumbling elegance but elegance tout court, I think I’ll let him paint it.
    I like all this gray stuff, especially since the authorities have told us we MUST paint the outside AND inside of the window frames in gray. Kind of limits the interior decor. Sigh. France.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We are enormously fortunate in that our beautiful village with it’s 11th century fort and church and ancient houses is NOT under any restrictive legislation re building work, decoration etc , it’s not BDF either , which is truly amazing,
      Enduit is a generic name for any wall base coating

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      • francetaste says:

        Aha. I’m in Carcassonne, and have become well-acquainted with both the bureau d’urbanisme and the Bâtiments de France. Our building is historically classified on the outside AND on the inside. It has been challenging, but at the same time, our intent was to preserve a maximum.

        Liked by 1 person

      • we want to preserve too, but not to the point that we forgo mod cons, sanity or our own style preferences. Although at least you have some guidance , we have had to make it up as we go along

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